2018 Appalachian Trail Days – Damascus, Virginia

Every year, we make the pilgrimage to Damascus, Virginia for the annual Appalachian Trail Days festival. Three days in Appalachia amongst some of our favorite people on Earth: accomplished and aspiring Thru-Hikers. The sheer number of people from every walk of life that pass thru Trail Town over the weekend never fails to amaze us. If you’re in the area and want to meet a colorful crew of Appalachian Trail hikers, this is the place to be.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This year we’ll have a trailer full of gear for sale (with event-only discounts), gear shakedowns, and raffles to cap off Friday and Saturday. Sign up early, and come by the booth at 4:00 P.M. for chances to win items from an assortment of great swag – including a 3400 Series Ultralight pack. See you there!


Damascus, Virginia is a small town is Southwest, Virginia that’s home to the convergence of seven hiking trails, including the point 470 miles in from the beginning of the Appalachian Trail. The regular population of just over 800 swells to nearly 30,000 when the town hosts the annual Trail Days Festival – a gathering of thru-hikers who are currently on trail, veteran hikers, and fans of the trail community. For more info check out the Official Trail Days 2018 brochure.

Cinco de Mayo: Backcountry Hydration Essentials

Grand Canyon Backcountry Margaritas Recipe

Celebrate without limits.

From deep in the Grand Canyon backcountry, ambassador Rich Rudow demonstrates his preferred way to mix up some ultralight margaritas while offering personal speculation into what ancient agave roasting in the region was really about.

Watch Video

A Hiker’s Return: The Pacific Crest Trail

Tommy "Twerk" Corey – Pacific Crest Trail 2018

Words & Photos by Tommy “Twerk” Corey

On the Pacific Crest Trail: Determination is the name of the game.

I got home tonight around 1AM, and after a long day of fake smiling and clearing dirty plates, I was ecstatic to take off my grease stained work clothes and seclude myself from the outside world.  I open my bedroom door, set my backpack down, take my work clothes off and immediately put on my short, black Nike hiking shorts and my new Hawaiian button up which I will wear on the Pacific Crest Trail.

Read More

Pack Discipline Starts Here: Stuff Sacks + Pods

No Matter Where You Are. Every Piece of Gear Matters.

A perfected ultralight set up results in more time to enjoy the experiences of your endeavor. Our Dyneema® Composite Fabrics (formerly Cuben Fiber) Stuff Sacks and Pods let you achieve that perfection with myriad ways to dial in, organize, protect, and even lighten the system that works best for you. Every piece of your kit is as important as the last. Pack discipline starts here.

Shop Stuff Sacks + Pods

No Quarter: Unridden Lines Crossing The Purcells

UltaMid Insert Bikepacking Camp

What was meant to be an exploratory mission bikepacking in British Columbia with a seasoned crew of altitude-hungry mountain bikers could easily have doubled as the ultimate ‘Google Earth Sandbag.’

The plan was to travel by bike along the northeastern border of Canada’s Glacier National Park, venturing through a maze of tectonic uplift in search of steep, scree-filled chutes that had never before been ridden. The total distance would be about 200 kilometers, and the team reckoned it could be completed in six to eight days. This was easier said than done. These mountains boasted some of the most technical terrain any of them had ever seen. Every morsel of purchase was parceled with sweat equity. It was do or die. The mountains would take no prisoners. They would offer no quarter.

Watch The Film

Traverse the Wind River Range: With Purpose

Words & Photos by Dave Anderson

Most of the expeditions I have been on during my 35 years as an alpinist have involved trudging up from the foothills into the mountains under a massive pack. I was often loaded down with 75+ pounds of climbing gear, camping supplies and food for up to two weeks. However, from a basecamp or road head I had also experienced going fast and light in the mountains, especially in the Winds. And after setting the FKT speed ascent of Mt. Gannett, my eyes started looking out across the range for a bigger objective. Why not try and traverse the entire Wind River Range in a single push?

continue reading

Seeking Balance: Reflections from a Triple Crowner

The Triple Crown of Hiking

Words & Photos by Robin “Little Spoon” Standish

I stood at the Northern terminus of the Continental Divide Trail, amid the acrid haze of the wildfires that had filled my lungs for the better part of a month. My dirt stained fingertips hesitantly touched the cold, coarse granite monument that gave my Triple Crown a sense of finality after three years of life on the trail(s). While the moment was both powerful and precious, I felt suffocated by the question of what now?

continue reading

2018 Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award Open for Applications

2018 Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award

Salt Lake City, UT (January 15, 2018) – The family and close friends of the late Kyle Dempster, with the support of Outdoor Research, Higher Ground Coffee, Black Diamond, CiloGear, Keen Footwear, PROBAR, La Sportiva, Liberty Mountain, Hyperlite Mountain Gear and Duct Tape Then Beer, are excited and proud to announce the first annual Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award.

One of America’s great young alpinists best known for first ascents of big remote peaks around the globe, Kyle Dempster was a passionate climber, adventurer and friend who fully lived his 33 years before he and his climbing partner Scott Adamson disappeared while attempting to climb the North Face of the Ogre II in Pakistan, in August of 2016.

Though Kyle loved climbing, traveling and going on adventures with friends, many of his most memorable and creative trips were done alone, traversing wild corners of the world by himself and under his own power. From kiteskiing hundreds of miles across Baffin Island, to his biking and climbing trip across Kygryzstan that was made famous in the short film The Road from Karakol, Kyle found a deep sense of meaning and joy in exploring the world on his own.

2018 Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award

Each year, the Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award will be given to an American solo adventurer embarking on a journey that embodies Kyle’s passionate spirit and love of exploration, with an emphasis on storytelling and leave no trace ethics. The recipients are by no means limited to climbers, and the trips awarded by no means must involve the big mountains Kyle loved—on the contrary, we encourage applications for human-powered solo adventures of all kinds—big or small, remote or urban, cold and icy or hot and sunny.

Applications will be accepted from January 15 – March 15, 2018 for trips taking place between April 1, 2018 – March 31, 2019.

Download the application here and for more information please visit www.KDSoloAward.com.

Applications must be submitted via email to KDsoloaward@gmail.com, subject line [Solo Adventure Award Application]. 

The winner will be announced on March 27, Kyle’s birthday.

Contact: Andy Anderson | 708-703-7445 | KDsoloaward@gmail.com

Oh, Canada: Packrafting The Northwest Territories

Packrafting Canada

Words & Photos by Paul Burbidge // Videos by Dylan Stewart

We’d made the Mackenzie River and the trip was over. We still had 100 kilometers of river to paddle but the unknowns were behind us and we started paddling by ourselves, in our own heads. We were already partly home and tied up with future activities, work, spouses etc. Or maybe this was just me. I struggle with being able to see my future. The Mackenzie River is wide, slow and straight. Wide means two kilometers wide and straight means sections long enough that the river has a horizon line- like the ocean. There is no unknown. Our next few hours were laid out in front of us. They would be long and hot and we’d have to paddle to make up for the lack of current. Our paddling didn’t seem to have any effect but we moved along.

Read More

Thru Hiking the Greater Patagonian Trail (GPT)

Words & Photos by Bethany “Fidgit” Hughes + Lauren “Neon” Reed

“I don’t think a thru-hiker would much enjoy the Greater Patagonian Trail,” Neon, a Triple Crowner and my hiking partner in tackling the length of the Andes, mused. We were taking a yerba mate break about a month after hiking the Greater Patagonian Trail over the course of two seasons. “Thru-hiking is a balance between total suckage and astounding beauty and there are some long, sucky sections,” she completed the thought around long draws on the metal straw.

The Greater Patagonian Trail is a succession of routes created to enable distance hikers to immerse themselves in Patagonian landscape and culture. You can’t fully appreciate one without the other. This means you have to know how to handle yourself on long, remote distances AND communicate in Spanish while being able to adapt to Patagonian social standards. Any combination of these and you will enjoy large segments of the various routes but a straight thru-hike kinda sucks.

Read More

Bikepacking Alaska’s Nulato Hills

Video by Luc Mehl // Photos by Luc Mehl + Eric Parsons

The Nulato Hills are a relatively unknown area of Western Alaska, even to experienced ambassador Luc Mehl, who has grown up in the state and is well versed on what it has to offer. But, after researching any satellite imagery he could find, he decided that the region looked ripe for a bikepacking route. So, Luc teamed up with Revelate Designs founder/owner Eric Parsons to come up with a ~100-mile route along Muskox trails from the village of Nulato. We recently caught up with him for a quick chat about the trip and some insight into exploring such an untravelled wilderness.

Read the Q&A

Tested By The Trusted: Windrider Ultralight Pack

Tested By The Trusted: Windrider
Photo by Krystian Repolona // Appalachian Trail

Our first foray into the world of backpacks (circa 2010) was the Windrider Ultralight Pack, which has since become the pack that has helped us refine our goal of building durable, ultralight gear that excels on any backcountry mission. And after repeated testing over the years, it is still our go-to pack suggestion for anyone looking to go lighter.

With mesh pockets that are perfect for drying out gear, and three volume options (40, 55 and 70L), the Windrider is ready-to-go on anything from weekend overnights to a 2,000-mile thru hike or Alaskan expedition. But you don’t have to take it from us. We receive tons of customer feedback and work with an experienced group of gear testers to help provide honest feedback to anyone exploring pack options on the World Wide Web, and below you’ll find a few of our favorites snippets.

Read The Reviews

Off-Season Gear Care + Storage

Cabins, barns, attics, garages or closets all work for storing your outdoor gear.

Taking care of and storing our outdoor gear is an art we’re still trying to master. After all, outdoor gear is an investment, and for the sake of the environment (and your bank account), you want it to go the distance to avoid repeatedly replacing items. Here’s a break-down of a few of the essential things we consider before packing gear away for the season.

Continue Reading

Packrafting Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife Refuge

Alaska: Arctic Wildlife Refuge

Words & Photos by Don Carpenter

Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife Refuge is awe inspiring- it is big, wild, remote country. Mountains are stacked upon mountains, interspersed with free flowing rivers. The Refuge stretches from the south side of the Brooks Range, over the glaciated high peaks of the range, and across the coastal plain to the Arctic Ocean. I often marveled at the remoteness, as I realized how far we were from the nearest village or road.

[Note from Don] When I wrote this story, I had no idea that the debate over drilling within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would surface again so soon. This debate has gone on for decades, and drilling is again on the table. The US Senate has just passed a tax bill that includes an amendment that would allow drilling on the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge.  The House of Representatives and the Senate need to reconcile their bills and then it will go to the President. If you are opposed to oil development in this place, now is the time to speak up.  If you are so inclined, please let your representatives know you are against drilling in this incredible place.

Continue Reading

Whitewater Packrafting 101: 10 Things You Need to Know to Paddle Safe + Strong

To celebrate the launch of our newest product, the River Rescue Throw Bag, we asked Hyperlite Mountain Gear ambassador Mark Oates to put together a comprehensive guide to technical paddling—call it packrafting 101. A certified whitewater instructor and outdoor educator, Mark regularly leads trips through the remote Tasmanian wilderness near his home zone. Ever detail-oriented and meticulous, Mark produced a thorough treatise on how to get the most out of any day on any creek in your boat, and get home in one piece. Huge thanks to Mark for sharing vital expertise that is sure to make us all smarter and safer as packrafting continues to blow up. 

Words by Mark Oates // Photos by Dan Ransom + Mark Oates

You’ve got the latest and greatest packraft, you’ve got the cool hardcore creeking helmet—call it a complete kit—and you even have some decent river miles under your belt. So, now you want to take it to the next level. But wait…

Is there something else that you still need? Why do others make paddling hard rapids look effortless, while you come close to swimming? Why can some packrafters hit that particular eddy every time but you consistently struggle to catch it? How come your friends can easily surf waves for ages, yet you find it challenging to simply paddle across strong currents?

Is it the boat? Is it the river? Is it you? Do you simply need more time on the water?

Read More

Backpacking Breakfast Recipes For Your Most Important Meal

Morning on the Appalachian Trail.
Morning on the Appalachian Trail. Photo: Samuel Martin.

By Matt Jenkins

Your daily food intake should include a mix of complex carbohydrates, simple carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Breakfasts are no exception. Breakfast is commonly believed to be the most important meal of the day because you need to resupply the calories that you consumed while you were sleeping. Of course, if you’re on a trip, you also need to lay a solid foundation of calories for your upcoming aerobic endeavors. That means finding backpacking breakfast recipes that are delicious and pack a nutritional punch.

Read More

Just Go: In Defense of Day Hikes and Quick Overnight Backpacking Trips

Annie MacWilliams is a Triple Crown hiker (AT09, PCT11, CDT13) who is lucky enough to call Utah home. Recently, the five month trips have morphed into overnights, weekends, and the lucky week here and there. But the list of quick hitters keeps getting longer. She’s also a new dog mom to a lazy pit mastiff mix who likes to walk slow and nap a lot. And that’s okay too. Here she explains that the really important part is just being out there—by any means necessary.

For me, not every trip needs to be epic, #sponsored, or Type 2 fun.

In fact, they rarely are.

Often just being there, outside, feeling small and exposed to the elements, with nothing more than the belongings on my back, is all I need to be filled with satisfaction. I’ve been lucky enough to spend months in the wilderness, both domestic and abroad, all months of the year, and now I’ve developed a strong infatuation for my backyard. Some of my favorite trips include nothing more than a Daybreak daypack filled with the essentials, a headlamp, and 12 hours. I wish I had weeks, months, years to wander, but the critical part is that I still wander.

Read More

Ultralight Backpacking Stuff Sacks for Thru Hikes & Backcountry Trips

Stuff Sacks for Backpacking

Words by Mike St. Pierre

Stripped Down Backpacking Stuff Sacks for Waterproof Redundancy & Organization

Most backpackers and thru hikers use stuff sacks, sometimes almost by default. A lot of gear comes with them—tents, sleeping bags, sleeping pads, and even stuff like stoves. More often than not, what comes straight from the manufacturer is more of an after thought than anything else. Most backpacking stuff sacks are out of the technological orbit of the products they are made to contain. Cheap-o nylon, poorly constructed, outdated: they aren’t as light as they could be or as water resistant as they should be.

So I always recommend that people who are just getting started with ultralight stuff sacks begin by replacing the less-than-ideal standard stuff sacks they’re already carrying. It’s a great way to drop sometimes up to a pound of weight, just by switching materials from nylon to Dyneema Composite Fabrics (DCF, formerly Cuben Fiber). If you’ve already invested in a high tech product like an ultralight sleeping bag, quilt or pad, why not protect it from the elements and wear-and-tear with an equally high tech product that is lighter, waterproof and will also last longer than any other alternative?

Read on…

Oh, Canada: Fat Rafting Kluane National Park

Words & Photos by Paul Burbidge

The May long weekend is the year’s first real chance to get out in the mountains and paddle. In 2016 our plans had been thwarted by a faulty river gauge that was reading 10 times the actual flow. In 2017 our plans weren’t looking good due to too little water in the rivers we wanted to paddle and too much snow in the mountains we needed to cross.

Our last minute substitution was to paddle the Kaskawulsh River in Kluane National Park. Access would be up the Slims River Valley and out via the Alsek River Trail. None of us were really excited about the amount of flat hiking involved in this route and we knew the Kaskawulsh would be pretty tame, so we decided that we’d use fat bikes in addition to our pack rafts.

Dave Gonda, Dylan Stewart and I got out of town on Friday afternoon, stopped in Haines Junction to register our trip with Parks Canada, and were underway at the Slims River by 6 pm.

Read More

Page 1 of 1512345...10...Last »