Backpacking the Cordillera Real, Bolivia

Words & Photos by Bethany "Fidgit" Hughes // Her Odyssey

Distance: 90 Miles (145 Km)
Duration: 5 - 8 days
Level: Challenging
Access: El Alto, La Paz - Sorata, Peru
Season: May-September

This impressive range rears north of La Paz. Peaks above 20,000 ft. and passes at over 16,000 ft, tropical glaciers, snaking milky rivers, llamas, and locals, this trail is a dream for the seasoned mountain hiker and international traveler. There are multiple options for hiking the Cordillera Real which range from three to 14 days. The problem with this range is not a lack of trails, but perhaps too many to choose from. Some sections are almost exclusively used by herdsmen, and their animals leave many tracks.

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A Desert Fish Out of Water

What a South Westerner learned on a week-long Appalachian Trail section hike from Rangeley to Caratunk, Maine.

Roots. Millions, and millions of roots. Within 100 yards of leaving the trailhead at the Highway 4 crossing of the Appalachian Trail (AT) outside of Rangeley, Maine, I realized that this backpacking trip was going to be far different than the hundreds of trips I had done in the southwest desert. For one, I had never hiked on a trail covered in slippery roots projecting randomly across and along the trail waiting to take down the unaware. The forest canopy supported by those roots was a magical jungle that blotted out the sun creating more humidity than I had ever experienced.

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Backpacking Ruta de Los Pioneros, Chile

Hiking Ruta de Los Pioneros, Chile
Words & Photos by Bethany "Fidgit" Hughes // Her Odyssey
Distance: 101 Miles (162.5 km)
Duration: 7 - 11 Days
Level: Challenging
Access: Villa O'Higgins-Cochrane, Chile
Season: December - February

This ‘Ruta Patrimonial’ of Chile is already incorporated into the far wider Greater Patagonian Trail. It's generally agreed that the “Ruta de Los Pioneros” is one of the most astounding sections of that region, and it sees very few hikers each year. With intertwining and disappearing trails that cross through river fed glaciers and wind past the glaciers themselves, and a portion that even pops into a corner of Argentina, this remote and austere trail is only recommended for highly experienced trekkers. Ample GPS experience is a must, and those who choose to embark on this trip must be comfortable with carrying up to nine days of food.

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You Don't Need an Ankle to Packraft

Photos by Jessica Kelley

One of three recipients of the Kyle Dempster Solo Adventure Award, Jessica Kelley followed a circuitous broken-ankle led journey through a variety of modes of wilderness travel to finally hatch her own 1,300-mile bike and packraft trip in Alaska.

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2018 Pacific Crest Trail Partnership

Today is the 50th anniversary of the designation of the country’s first two National Scenic Trails – the Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails. It’s impossible to measure how much enjoyment they’ve brought to the millions of people who have sought adventures big and small on them. And likely just as difficult to know how many people have put in countless hours of work into advocacy and maintenance on their behalf. The Pacific Crest Trail Association is one such group that’s done a lot of heavy lifting over the years.
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REpack is Here to Level Up Your Outdoor Dining Experiences

What’s the Story with the REpack Freezer Bag Cook System?

Our new REpack freezer bag cook system will elevate your dining experience out on the trail. 

Some might argue that the most significant side-effect of backpacking, thru-hiking, and multi-sporting is being able to eat like a pelican. But we don’t all do it as well as we could with nutrition, caloric intake, or even just the pure enjoyment of eating some food the way it is intended to be consumed – hot for starters! When your home and kitchen sit on your shoulders in vast, disconnected expanses, goals like these aren’t always easy to achieve.

What to eat, however, isn’t the only consideration for the meticulous hiker and explorer. Ponder the size and weight of pre-packaged food bags and containers, times that by the number of days you’re out or between resupply, and subsequently, how the size of your garbage bag grows. That’s a lot of wasted space.

Enter our new REpack freezer bag cook system. How many ways will it improve your life in the great outdoors, you ask?

Walk with us.

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Scenic Overlook Ahead – Seth Timpano's Views

A climber for nearly 20 years, Hyperlite Mountain Gear Ambassador Seth Timpano has seen the world from some incredibly uncommon vantage points.

As a guide for Alpine Ascents International, he’s helped quite a few fellow climbers rack up some unbelievable sights of their own. We asked him where the drive upwards comes from, why he believes going ultralight is a great way forward, and what’s on his horizon.

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Power-Ups on Route – Trail Magic in Maine

“Trail Magic,” for the uninitiated, is an action that is, in so many ways, precisely what it sounds like. It’s an unexpected gesture that can positively change the dynamic of a thru hiker’s day. It should be positive anyway. I doubt a surprise offer to wrestle would go as far with a weary traveler as food or a free shower, but who knows. These are interesting times.
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Raise the Roof – The Incomparable Qualities of the Ultamid (and Tips and Tricks for Set Up and Care)

Hopefully, when one thinks of “home,” they’re quick to jump to their own combinations of security, comfort, sentimentality, and pride. Imagine if you could take that thing called home and change the view out the front door anytime you wanted by moving it around and pitching it in some of the wildest and most beautiful places on Earth. WELCOME TO #THEULTAMIDEXPERIENCE

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AN ALASKAN ODYSSEY BY WHEEL AND WATER

Words by Bjorn Olson

Howdy Hyperlite Mountain Gear Blog Readers!

I wanted to introduce myself along with the rest of the small team that will be joining me this fall on a previously un-attempted fat bike and packraft trip through an intriguing and rarely visited corner of Alaska. Our little cadre of three will be made up my girlfriend who is, amongst other winning traits, my principal trip-partner, best friend, a naturalist/artist and well-versed wilderness adventure bum, Kim McNett.

Daniel Countiss, a veteran to rowdy and remote fat bike expeditions, a former Georgian and now fellow Homer, Alaska resident, will also be joining us. Daniel is a professional welder and is owner/operator of the custom bicycle company Defiance Frameworks. His personal bike is a customized reflection of the terrain we regularly find ourselves traversing – light but strong, simple, big tired, and capable.

 

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